Image
Innovate Faithfully

Secularism and pluralism

Once again MIchael Jinkins, the president of Louisville Seminary, offers a pointed reflection on the challenges of living in the global and diverse world we inhabit. Read his whole essay, but here’s a taste to whet your interest: If we construe our differences as merely matters of individual taste and preference, we trivialize the religious and moral questions that unite
by Faith+Lead | January 12, 2012

Once again MIchael Jinkins, the president of Louisville Seminary, offers a pointed reflection on the challenges of living in the global and diverse world we inhabit. Read his whole essay, but here’s a taste to whet your interest:

If we construe our differences as merely matters of individual taste and preference, we trivialize the religious and moral questions that unite and separate us. We also cut ourselves off from the basic social unit of understanding and persuasion, which is not the individual exercising choice among isolated reasoned options in a graduate seminar on moral topics, but the person in community, where moral choices are made in several dimensions at once, all of which are fraught with social, personal, familial, political, cultural, and religious significance.

Upcoming Learning Experiences

Don't Miss an Insight

Get The Faith+Leader delivered directly to your inbox.

Unsubscribe anytime. We'll never rent or share your information.